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    Percy Parker: A Heroine I Can Relate To By Stacey Agdern
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  • Published: Aug 29th, 2009

Stacey Cell PhotoI’m not the sort of reader who tends to relate to the heroine of most novels I read.  I think it’s mostly because the reaction of most heroines to the extraordinary circumstances they find themselves in are so unlike what mine would be.  And so it is a rare thing and a momentous occasion when I do actually find one.  I have found a few: Ilana Hamilton from Susan Grant’s ‘The Star Princess’, Amanda from Lisa Kleypas’ ‘Suddenly You’ , Alicia Lawrence from Celeste Bradley’s “Seducing a Spy” and…Percy Parker from Leanna Renee Hieber’s “The Strangely Beautiful Tale of Percy Parker.”

Percy Parker? Yep.  Absolutely.  Why?  Well, she blushes, stammers, and tries to be invisible in a crowd of people that scare her, like in this scene:

Sitting near the back, Percy tried to become invisible.  However, as pale as she was, transparency was impossible.

She is also capable of missing a line or two.  Like in this scene:

“Numbers are no different, Miss Parker.  They are a language in and of themselves.”

“I wish my mind could consider them as such, sir.”

“You are the verbal type, I see.”

Percy offered a tiny smile.  “Well, actually, sir, I’m rather quiet.”

“Your mind prefers words to numbers,” the professor clarified, unamused.”

strangely_beautiful_book_coverBut that does not, and should not mean she is in any means incapable.  There is a serious difference between fallibility and capability.  As very well demonstrated in this scene:

Professor Rychman sighed and rose from his chair.  He turned to the fire behind him and muttered irritably in an archaic tongue, a long dead dialect.  What was it?  All Percy knew was that after a moment, the words became clear.  “None shall weave my teaching who cannot first grasp a thread.  And why am I wasting my time when there is so much else to be done.

In response, Percy raised her eyebrows and replied in the same Archaic tongue.  “One must weave if she is to excel at the loom.  But if you’ve more important work, Professor, is there a way I may be of assistance?”  The conviction with which she spoke surprised them both.

That one sequence demonstrates the fabulousness; the enigma wrapped in a riddle that is Miss Percy Parker.  Fallible and shy, yet possessing more power and intelligence than anybody would expect her to have.  But what makes her fallible, makes her someone I can relate to.  And in an era filled with fictional kickass heroines, that is an exceptional thing indeed.

6 Responses to “Percy Parker: A Heroine I Can Relate To By Stacey Agdern”

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  1. Maria Lokken
    on Aug 29th, 2009
    @ 5:43 pm

    Percy Parker is certainly an unusual heroine. For those who haven’t read this terrific book – Percy is most different.

    I think what I enjoyed most about her was her quiet strength. I was wonderfully surprised at the end when she……(no spoilers from me)


  2. Andrea
    on Aug 29th, 2009
    @ 6:47 pm

    Maria, you tease! Percy’s unusual, you say? Hmmm, how very intriguing. Wonderful blog, Stacey!


  3. Gannon
    on Aug 29th, 2009
    @ 11:03 pm

    I’m really looking forward to reading this book.

    Excellent blog, Stacey!


  4. Buffie
    on Aug 30th, 2009
    @ 7:59 am

    I have heard quite a bit about this book and all of it has me thinking I should read it! Great blog Stacey.


  5. PJ
    on Aug 30th, 2009
    @ 8:15 am

    I haven’t read this one yet. There sure is a lot of buzz about it. Thanks for sharing your favorite heroine with us, Stacey!


  6. Pam P
    on Aug 31st, 2009
    @ 6:20 am

    This is one book I have to get. Percy’s sounds like the type of character I’d like a lot, heroines like this often appeal to me more than the now popular kick-ass gals. I like Amanda (Kleypas), too, one of my favorite of her books.