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    Guest Author Linda Mooney
  • Author:
  • Published: Aug 11th, 2009

MyStrength_erotic_romance_bookA friend in high school introduced me to my first romance novel:  Georgette Heyer’s Devil’s Cub.  To an innocent seventeen-year-old, I was intrigued, titillated, and hooked.  But I couldn’t feed my hunger for more of those kinds of books until I got to college.  So while other students partied, I was holed up in my dorm room devouring endless romance novels.

It wasn’t long before I stumbled upon Janelle Taylor’s Moondust and Madness.  It was my first sci-fi romance novel, and I fell totally in love.  Unfortunately, there weren’t that many such romances that I could find, and I was left to satisfy my craving via movies, TV, and the rare novel.

Not long after I began teaching, a different friend loaned me her fanzine for a television series I enjoyed.  Fanzines.  Sci-fi and fantasy romances.  Although the stories were not that well written, I was sold.  I had been dabbling in creative writing since I was a kid, and after much coaxing from my friend, I wrote my own story.  A fanzine editor took it, and thus began my fledgling writing career.

But it wasn’t enough.  For one thing, I couldn’t deviate from the “bible” specified for that TV series.  The only thing I could do, and which inevitably sold more fanzines than ever, was to delve into the romance and sex lives of those characters.

The “hotter”, the better.

Still, the gloss was gone for me because I remained chained to the unbendable restrictions placed by the series and their creators.  I wanted to write my own books, my own stories, to create my own worlds and characters.  In which genre was the question.  Contemporary felt too much like real life, and at that time my real life was horrendous.  Historicals were too common.  Time travels were all the rage.  I was a Star Trek, Star Wars geek, and that’s where my heart lay.  It wasn’t until my husband wisely told me to “write what you want to read” that I got up the courage to cave in to my imagination.

It was the best damn advice I’ve ever received in my life.

With my husband’s continued support, I initially submitted my stories to epublishers mainly because they didn’t require me to have an agent.  With my first contract, I felt I had found my calling.

LordofThunder__romance_bookThrough the years, I’ve had my share of reputable and disreputable publishers, but I’ve never regretted being e-pubbed.  Does this mean I don’t have any interest in being New York pubbed?  Just the opposite; I would love to be.  But it won’t stop me from writing for epubs.  Why?  Because they’re willing to take a chance on my erotic sci-fi romances.   Through them, readers have found me, and for that I owe a debt of gratitude.

A question I often get is why do I write sci-fi romances?  Because through them I can take readers to worlds they’ve never dreamed of.  They can meet people and creatures, and encounter circumstances they won’t find elsewhere.  Anything is possible, and the least little thing can be an adventure.  I can write my own history and my own future.

Of course, when one of your characters is from another planet, lovemaking may or may not be a “natural” occurrence with a partner.  I have juggled with that dilemma.  In most cases, my hero and heroine can do the horizontal tango the way we Earthlings do.  But I have dared to change the rules of the game in a few of my books, and hoped that the differences weren’t too drastic to repulse or turn the reader off.

Will I consider writing a straight contemporary or historical, or western or paranormal or…?  Well, I have done a couple of those, just to see if I could.  However, I wholly believe that writers are like doctors and teachers.  They stick with what they’re comfortable with, with what they like and enjoy.  Some doctors prefer to be internists, others gravitate toward being pediatricians.  Some educators have great success as high school teachers, while others find their niche in a Kindergarten classroom.

I write erotic science fiction and fantasy romances.  It’s what I love, and who I am.

Find out more about Linda Mooney and her writing.

11 Responses to “Guest Author Linda Mooney”

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  1. Marisa
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 7:23 am

    Hi Linda, Welcome to RNTV. I’m so curious. I’ve never heard of a fanzine – which TV show did you write about?

    I also wonder, do you feel as if you have more freedom with your world building writing fantasy and sci fi?


  2. Maria Lokken
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 7:37 am

    Hi Linda – so glad you could join us today.

    I always find it fascinating when authors create characters from another planet – what’s the most unusual one you’ve created?


  3. Linda
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 10:28 am

    Hi, Marisa! And thanks to all for allowing me to come be a part of RNT. I’m thrilled to be here!

    What is a fanzine? A fanzine is literally a book of stories based on a tv show or movie. In many cases, if viewers get a sense of sexual hesitancy between the main characters, or if a movie doesn’t “end” the way they wanted it to, they can “flesh” that out in their stories. The shows I wrote for were “Beauty and the Beast”, “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir”, “Ladyhawke” “The Phantom of the Opera”, “Lois & Clark (Superman)”, “Quantum Leap”, “X-Files”, and “Zorro”.

    And, yes! I know I have more freedom to world build in the fantasy/sci-fi genre. Even if the story partially takes place on Earth, I can add elements of “otherworldliness”.

    Thank you for asking! 😀


  4. Linda
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 10:34 am

    Hi, Maria!

    I would say my most unusual character is actually several. LOL! My alien Ruinos from my Runner’s Moon series. Although they can shapeshift to appear human, they’re not like us. They perceive emotions is by smell. A lot of what they’re capable of, including their great personal strength, is completely different from anything remotely human. Even their anatomy is different, which made writing love scenes a challenge.

    Thank you for an intriguing question!


  5. Lulu
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 11:33 am

    Hi Linda,

    I’m a huge fan of Sci-Fi and I really enjoyed Ladyhawke, Beauty and the Beast, and the X-files. Is it possible to get a hold of your fanzines on these now?


  6. Linda
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 12:17 pm

    Hi, Lulu!

    http://www.macwombat.com


  7. Sharon E. Dreyer
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 1:41 pm

    This is a great article! Reading is a passion of mine and I’ve read romance, action adventure, hard and soft science fiction, fantasy, comedy, etc. Thanks for sharing. Check out my first and recently released novel, Long Journey to Rneadal. This exciting story is a romantic action adventure in space.


  8. Anne Lynne Wythe
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 2:37 pm

    Thanks, Linda, for telling readers about your backstory. It’s fun to see what shapes an author! Happy writing!


  9. Linda
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 3:59 pm

    Thank you, Anne!


  10. Teal Ceagh
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 4:33 pm

    Hi Linda:

    Your website doesn’t say where you’re located, so I wanted to ask what sort of television you were writing for. There were some excellent English shows in the seventies and eighties — Blake’s 7, for instance — that had all sorts of sexy subplots going on that had whole fanzines and fan clubs devoted to the intrigues and subtexts of the show.

    As an urban fantasy writer myself, I can appreciate your need to write outside the restrictions of a contemporary world. Congratulations on your new book. Best wishes for mega sales.


  11. Linda
    on Aug 11th, 2009
    @ 5:34 pm

    Hi, Teal!

    I’m in a small south Texas town located near the Gulf coast, but I know about Blake’s 7 although I’ve never seen an episode. I’m a big Dr. Who and Red Dwarf fan, as well.

    Thank you for your comment and good wishes. You know first-hand how much fun it is to world build. 😀